The Necessity of Conflict

“Tension can be uncomfortable but necessary. The tension I had in my own life was I had came from the South Asian desire to pursue medicine while also pursuing other avenues of interest. It was a good way to go forward but also constrictive. I was part of the earlier South Asian immigrant wave and came from a community where we were some of the first to be raised in the USA. I wanted to understand why the broader Muslim community was in its [subjugated] condition, and I got a lot more support from non-desis in grasping this than than the South Asian community.

Because South Asians immigrants come from a clerical background, they come from the Indian Civil Service mindset, they often were not taught to challenge authority. The boss says this, I do it to perfection, and then he gives me a cookie or he gives me a house. Now I’m happy. As a result, there’s a contentment in that life, but you’re also living in a bubble, and that bubble is something the Muslim community and Muslim identity can help bust. Because the minute you start talking to Arab individuals or people of African American heritage, you realize that this bubble is our own collective creation. So you have to be careful  when you burst that bubble, you have to be able to navigate it because then you’re exposed to the whole world.

One has to create a new narrative to explain the world where academic success is not the only goal in life.  Then you realize the world is not what they told you. That’s okay, but you have to gain the skills to handle that. And so my own journey is not one of just becoming a doctor, it’s reconciling the uncertainty, so I’m not only a physician…but I’m also an activist. I’m very active at the school in Crescent academy, I was a co-founder of ISPU and serve on boards across the state. That element of service and building new institutions allowed me to experience a broader world which transcends academics without giving it up.

The other element that I think is a part of who I am is conflict. Muslims, especially of South Asian extraction, have a deep aversion to conflict, and as a result have limited conflict resolution despite their relative intellect and wealth. The mosque conflict in the USA and in our ancestral homeland shows you that their skills are not there. Those are soft skills that are not developed in technical fields. Figuring out those soft skills have helped me in serving my family, the community, my patients and our region. They have helped us navigate conflict without collapsing our institutions and help us find new ways of working together. I do hope the new generation embraces these challenges of conflict and find a way to work together even more effectively.” – Dr. Humzavi, a physician and co-founder of ISPU on the necessity of conflict. 

"The tension I had in my own life was I had came from the South Asian desire to pursue medicine while also pursuing other avenues of interest. It was a good way to go forward but also constrictive. I was part of the earlier south Asian immigrant wave and came from a community where we were some of the first to be raised in the USA. I wanted to understand why the broader Muslim community was in its [subjugated] condition, and I got a lot more support from non-desis in grasping this than than the South Asian community. Because South Asians immigrants come from a clerical background, they come from the Indian Civil Service mindset, they often were not taught to challenge authority. The boss says this, I do it to perfection, and then he gives me a cookie or he gives me a house. Now I’m happy. As a result, there’s a contentment in that life, but you’re also living in a bubble, and that bubble is something the Muslim community and Muslim identity can help bust. Because the minute you start talking to Arab individuals or people of African American heritage, you realize that this bubble is our own collective creation. So you have to be careful when you burst that bubble, you have to be able to navigate it because then you’re exposed to the whole world. One has to create a new narrative to explain the world where academic success is not the only goal in life…And so my own journey is not one of just becoming a doctor, it’s reconciling the uncertainty, so I’m not only a physician…but I’m also an activist. I’m very active at the school in Crescent academy, I was a co-founder of ISPU and serve on boards across the state…The other element that I think is a part of who I am is conflict. Muslims, especially of South Asian extraction, have a deep aversion to conflict, and as a result have limited conflict resolution despite their relative intellect and wealth. The mosque conflict in the USA and in our ancestral homeland shows you that their skills are not there. Those are soft skills that are not developed in technical fields. Figuring out those soft skills have helped me in serving my family, the community, my patients and our region.” -Iltefat Hamzavi on conflict. #HZM

A post shared by Humare Zamaane Mein (@humare_zamaane_mein) on

 

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Hi, I'm the founder of The PhDream. I'm a second year docoral student who wasn't satisfied with sititng behind a desk and doing research. While my research may have an indirect impact, I wanted to engage with the community and provide a platform to discuss neglected and sensitive issues in minority communities. Along with that, I try to stay sane in my program by stress baking, glamming up even when I'm down, and sharing my dad-joke captions on the gram -- if only that creativity could translate into my research... Anyways, I'm always looking for contributors, collaborations, and people to eat my zelicious creations, so don't hesitate to reach out or follow me @ZuniJilani :)

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